Feeds:
Posts
Comments
O2Amp moves into lighting, for medical and everyday spaces. Bathe the whole space -- no eyewear needed.

O2Amp moves into lighting for medical and everyday spaces. Bathe the whole space — no eyewear needed.

At O2Amp we have patented optical filter technology specifically designed for helping us see people better. Last year we began producing eyewear for applications in medicine. We have had great reactions (see near the end of this story), and O2Amp was listed among the “Top Seven Health Innovations of 2012”.

We at O2Amp have now begun moving into lighting, because all the same perceptual enhancement occurs by bathing an entire room in the filtered light — no eyewear needed. The photo above is our first “O2Lamp” prototype.

There are two broad markets we’re working hard to move into: medical and everyday lighting.

MEDICAL LIGHTING

  1. General lighting for hospitals and ambulances: One of our three technologies (the Oxy-Amp) enhances perception of variations of oxygenation under the skin, providing a strict improvement to a clinician’s ability to assess, diagnose, and treat a patient. The filter cuts very little light out of the illuminant, provides the warm and human-friendly lighting expected for patient satisfaction, but has the tremendous benefit of aiding doctors, nurses and emergency personnel at perceiving the patient’s health.
  2. Specialized lighting for procedures: The three distinct O2Amp technologies (Oxy-Amp, Oxy-Iso, Hemo-Iso) provide distinct clinical viewing benefits, and we are in conversations with lighting companies to get the technologies in special-purpose lighting for surgeries and other procedures. One way to describe the technology is this: ambient near-surface passive medical imaging.
  3. Skin examination: Although O2Amp technology is designed for amplifying perception of blood under the skin, as a consequence the skin itself becomes more transparent, and easier to assess. (…akin to holding up a piece of parchment to a light, and only then being able to see the subtle variations in the parchment.) Here there are applications for dermatology, as well as for cosmeticians.

EVERYDAY LIGHTING

  1. Truly warm lighting: People perceive bluer white lights to be “cool”, and redder white lights to be “warm.” One of the principal reasons for this is that the redder lights help make the blood more visible in the skin of those around you — it amplifies the “warmth” from other people. Our O2Amp filter technology enhances these blood signals directly, and can be added to any white light, even blue-ish ones. Warmth isn’t just for red any more.
  2. Cosmetic lighting: Younger skin tends to be more transparent, with well-perfused underlying flesh. Because the O2Amp (the Oxy-Amp in particular) amplifies the visibility of the underlying blood, the result is that skin appears more transparent, and the flesh underlying it more perfused. …mimicking the traits found in more youthful skin. Skin looks younger and healthier under Oxy-Amp lighting, something useful in any everyday setting, but potentially especially so in clothing stores.

~~~

Mark Changizi is Director of Human Cognition at 2AI, and the author of Harnessed: How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man and The Vision Revolution. He is finishing up his new book, HUMAN 3.0, a novel about our human future, and working on his next non-fiction book, FORCE OF EMOTION.

O2Amp

I’m proud to announce that the O2Amp was listed as one of the
top seven health innovations of 2012 by Healthy Black Men Magazine. More about the O2Amp.

O2Amp’s Edu-Lenses

O2Amp frameless lenses, allowing us to easily send the set of three technologies to those wishing to learn more.

O2Amp frameless lenses, allowing us to easily send the set of three technologies to those wishing to learn more.

Having demonstrated the O2Amp all over the world, on television, and at TED, we at O2Amp have concluded that the best way for new users to best appreciate any one of our three principal medical technologies is to experience all three. Together they amount to a perceptual toolkit for the perception of health and emotion via enhanced sensitivity to the blood under the skin, and it becomes much more apparent what each technology does once trained on the entire toolkit.

In particular, two of them (the dark purple Oxy-Iso, and the green Hemo-Iso) isolate perception to one or the other of the two dimensions our eyes can see (hemoglobin oxygenation and concentration, respectively), and the third (the light purple Oxy-Amp) only amplifies one of the dimensions (oxygenation) without hindering the other (concentration). (See this link, and also this and this.)

In this light, we have begun manufacturing a new O2Amp educational kit consisting of one of each of the three unframed lenses you see in the image above. Order just one of the technologies, and you’ll not only receive the framed version below,

Framed O2Amp eyewear, where a single complex-shaped lens is used for both eyes. The new lenses are amenable as a training kit.

Framed O2Amp eyewear, where a single complex-shaped lens is used for both eyes. The new lenses are amenable for inclusion in the new edu-kit.

but also the set of three O2Amp “edu-lenses,” helping you better train yourself on their functionality.

~~~

See also our new testimonial sheet.

~~~

Mark Changizi is Director of Human Cognition at 2AI, and the author of Harnessed: How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man and The Vision Revolution. He is finishing up his new book, HUMAN 3.0, a novel about our human future, and working on his next non-fiction book, FORCE OF EMOTION.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

See my piece at Discover Magazine that refers to my research notes above.

You’ve heard about our O2Amp eyewear designed for viewing people — their health and emotions.

Here’s what it’s like to look through them…

——-

——-

Note that, by “good light is needed,” we mean outdoor lighting or a head lamp.

——-
——-
——-
And…below is the five-step training sheet for those new to the technology.

~~~

Mark Changizi is Director of Human Cognition at 2AI, and the author of Harnessed: How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man and The Vision Revolution. He is finishing up his new book, HUMAN 3.0, a novel about our human future.

The O2Amp amplifies perception of emotions, moods and health. Really.

One of the “7 Major Health Innovations of 2012 that Matter”.

And, no, they’re not merely tinted glasses. …gray (non-pink) versions coming soon.

O2Amps by 2AI

As seen in TIME Magazine, Technology Review, and WIRED, the world’s first eyewear designed to enhance the visibility of blood beneath the skin, giving doctors, nurses and other medical personnel a clearer view of vasculature, oxygenation, and trauma.

The O2Amp furnishes superior powers of clinical assessment and diagnosis, better visualizations for procedures and blood work, and is a central piece of medicine’s next-generation toolkit. Eye protection, but with an enhanced perception of health.

Comfortably wear it all day, or quickly pull it out as needed, whether it’s emergency medicine, surgery, dermatology, neonatology or elsewhere.

“It looks like my vision is compensated with Photoshop,” says neurosurgeon Dr. Kei Nomura, Chief of Center for Brain and Spine Surgery, Aoyama General Hospital.

We at 2AI Labs are excited to have our first spin-off company, O2Amps, the home of our patented eyewear and light filtering technology that amplifies one’s view of the emotions and health visible in the color and pallor of other people’s skin.

The technology comes out of my research while at Caltech on the evolution of color vision in primates, where I provided evidence that color vision evolved to sense oxygenation modulations in the hemoglobin under the skin. Once one understands the connection between our color vision and blood physiology, it’s possible to build filters that further amplify our perception of the blood and the signals it provides (a patented invention by myself and my co-director, Tim Barber).

insert

Because color vision evolved for everyday wear, so to speak, one of our largest markets is for everyday-wear sunglasses, to enhance one’s perception of the emotion, mood and health signals we evolved to detect with our color vision. For example, typical sunglasses shade the world but also end up shading one’s connections to other people; this is exemplified by the way people tip up their sunglasses to get a better look at someone. Our technology shades the world but not the social; for the O2Amps, one sees other people better by keeping them on, rather than tipping them up.

There are also applications in security, sports, poker, and dating. (See projects in development.)

And there are applications in medicine, which is where we believe we can make the greatest impact. In fact, for medicine we have developed three different technologies, and they can be described as…

— (i) Oxy-Iso: An oxygenation-isolator that amplifies perception of oxygenation modulations under the skin (and eliminates perception of variations in the concentration of hemoglobin),

— (ii) Hemo-Iso: A trauma-detector, or hemoglobin-concentration-isolator, that amplifies perception of hemoglobin concentrations under the skin (and eliminates perception of variations in oxygenation), and

— (iii) Oxy-Amp: A general clinical enhancer, or oxygenation-amplifier, that combines the best features of the first two; it eliminates neither signal (i.e., it retains perception of both variation in hemoglobin oxygenation and concentration), and only amplifies perception of oxygenation. It provides a strict enhancement to exactly the thing primate color vision evolved to sense.

We’ve received great interest from medical professionals interested in trying out the O2Amp, and we’re moving now to get them in hospitals and among clinical staff everywhere.

We’re also moving into lighting, where entire spaces can be filled with the same filtered light. …no eyewear needed.

We believe our Oxy-Amp is the new starting point for lens blanks.

Colorblind folk have found that the Oxy-Iso provides a big help for their red-green blindness.

See the O2Amp site for all our projects in development.

Note that good light is needed for the technology, by which we mean outdoor lighting or a head lamp.

Some useful links:
– The start-up for this technology… o2amp.com
Video from Daily Planet television show, Discovery Channel.
ABC News’ This Could Be Big Television.
– Introductory video (by filmmaker Emon Hasson)… Intro video
– Some testimonials… Testimonials
More testimonials
– What one sees… Illustration, Description
– Train yourself… in five steps (text only version).
– The research article on the evolution of color vision… Journal article

Some of the press interest in o2amp.com:
MSNBC, Sciencebase, Tech Rev, Betabeat, PopSci, ExameInformatica, Smithsonian, LiveScience/Yahoo, WIRED, NZ Herald, Investors, DesignBoom, Mobiledia, Discovery, PSFK, Neoteo, Earthsky, Good, Wissenundkonzepte, Stuff, Forbes, Actualidad, Geek, Gizmodo, PSFK, Neatorama, TIME, Oprah, BBC, DarkDaily; Lost At E Minor, ZenniOptical. Prevention Magazine, Scientific American / Txchnologist, Slashdot, Diffusion Radio, io9, The Times UK [subscription], BBC, Discovery News, Daily Mail UK, New Scientist, Smart Planet, CBC, Unexplained Mysteries, Telegraph, Voice of Russia, Geek Chic Mama, NY Daily News, GizMag, The Argus, Elite Daily, Columbia Chronicle, Under the Gun, Today, PopSci,
ABC News’ This Could Be Big.

Also, listed as one of the “7 Major Health Innovations of 2012 that Matter”.

~~~

Mark Changizi is Director of Human Cognition at 2AI, and the author of Harnessed: How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man and The Vision Revolution. He is finishing up his new book, HUMAN 3.0, a novel about our human future.

When complex systems are built, they’re built out of parts, and the parts come in multiple types.

For electronic circuits, any circuit can be built from a finite, universal set of component types. Does biology follow this “universal language” approach?

Well, no, as I discuss in this paper. And it turns out not even electronic circuits — as they exist in the real world, built by real companies — follow the universal-language approach.

And neither do Legos.

In both biology (networks of cells, neurons, or ants) and artifacts (networks of Legos, circuit components, or people), as the network gets larger, its division of labor increases (and as a power law).

But there are key differences as well that I discuss in the paper: Roughly, biological networks carry out their functions with more of their parts than human-created networks.

Samuel Arbesman, senior fellow at the Kauffman Foundation, has written a piece about this at WIRED. Roger Highfield also has written a piece on it at the Telegraph, this one aimed more at what’s gone wrong with Legos. And I’ve written a piece for Discover Mag on this what-happened-to-Legos issue.

~~~

Mark Changizi is Director of Human Cognition at 2AI, and the author of
Harnessed: How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man and The Vision Revolution. He is finishing up his new book, HUMAN, a novel about our human future.

New Scientist's Top Ten Science Books in 2011, Harnessed is on the right

I’m excited that my new book, Harnessed, is among New Scientist’s top ten science books of 2011, standing aside other authors I admire.

In the book I describe (and present a large battery of new evidence for) my radical new theory for how humans came to have language and music. They’re not instincts (i.e., we didn’t evolve them via natural selection), and they’re not something we merely learn. Instead, speech and music have themselves culturally evolved to fit us (not a new idea) by mimicking fundamental aspects of nature (my idea). Namely speech came to sound like physical events among solid objects, and music came to sound like humans moving and behaving in your midst (that’s why music is evocative). Each of these artifacts thereby came to harness an instinct we apes already possessed, namely auditory object-event recognition and auditory human-movement recognition mechanisms.

The story for how we came to have speech and music is, then, analogous to how we came to have writing, something we know we didn’t evolve. Writing, I’ve argued (in The Vision Revolution), culturally evolved to possess the signature shapes found in nature (and specifically in 3D scenes with opaque objects), and thereby harnessed our visual object-recognition system.

Buy the book here.

~~~

Mark Changizi is Director of Human Cognition at 2AI, and the author of
Harnessed: How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man and The Vision Revolution. He is finishing up his new book, HUMAN, a novel about our human future.

The Library Journal has a short review by Cynthia Knight of my book, Harnessed.

Many scientists believe that the human brain’s capacity for language is innate, that the brain is actually “hard-wired” for this higher-level functionality. But theoretical neurobiologist Changizi (director of human cognition, 2AI Labs; The Vision Revolution) brilliantly challenges this view, claiming that language (and music) are neither innate nor instinctual to the brain but evolved culturally to take advantage of what the most ancient aspect of our brain does best: process the sounds of nature. By “sounds of nature,” Changizi does not mean birds chirping or rain falling. His provocative theory is based on the identification of striking similarities between the phoneme level of language and the elemental auditory properties of solid objects and, in the case of music, similarities between the sounds of human movement and the basic elements of music.

Verdict: Although the book is written in a witty, informal style, the science underpinning this theoretical argument (acoustics, phonology, physics) could be somewhat intimidating to the nonspecialist. Still, it will certainly intrigue evolutionary biologists, linguists, and cultural anthropologists and is strongly recommended for libraries that have Changizi’s previous book.

~~~

Mark Changizi is Director of Human Cognition at 2AI, and the author of
Harnessed: How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man and The Vision Revolution.